550+ Best Killers of the Flower Moon Quotes

Lovely voice.. of the Movie ….great full faces of actors and actresses, nice music…. but most chilling…. ? how about abilities to hear a story to help things later, like Until the Flower Moon is heard….. their will be people wanting the story to be told so more peace can come.

Killers of the Flower Moon Quotes

“History is a merciless judge. It lays bare our tragic blunders and foolish missteps and exposes our most intimate secrets, wielding the power of hindsight like an arrogant detective who seems to know the end of the mystery from the outset.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: Oil, Money, Murder and the Birth of the FBI

“There was one question that the judge and the prosecutors and the defense never asked the jurors but that was central to the proceedings: Would a jury of twelve white men ever punish another white man for killing an American Indian? One skeptical reporter noted, “The attitude of a pioneer cattleman toward the full-blood Indian…is fairly well recognized.” A prominent member of the Osage tribe put the matter more bluntly: “It is a question in my mind whether this jury is considering a murder case or not. The question for them to decide is whether a white man killing an Osage is murder—or merely cruelty to animals.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“An Indian Affairs agent said, ‘The question will suggest itself, which of these people are the savages?”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI
tags: conquerors, government, savage16 likesLike
“As Sherlock Holmes famously said, “When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“There never has been a country on this earth that has fallen except when that point was reached…where the citizens would say, ‘We cannot get justice in our courts.’ ”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“What is gone is treasured because it was what we once were. We gather our past and present into the depths of our being and face tomorrow. We are still Osage. We live and we reach old age for our forefathers.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

Also Read: 50 Best Once Upon a Time in the West Quotes

“Yet an ugliness often lurked beneath the reformist zeal of Progressivism. Many Progressives—who tended to be middle-class white Protestants—held deep prejudices against immigrants and blacks and were so convinced of their own virtuous authority that they disdained democratic procedures.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“For years after the American Revolution, the public opposed the creation of police departments, fearing that they would become forces of repression.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“The world’s richest people per capita were becoming the world’s most murdered.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“Stores gone, post office gone, train gone, school gone, oil gone, boys and girls gone—only thing not gone is graveyard and it git bigger.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“In May, when coyotes howl beneath an unnervingly large moon, taller plants, such as spiderworts and black-eyed Susans, begin to creep over the tinier blooms, stealing their light and water. The necks of the smaller flowers break and their petals flutter away, and before long they are buried underground. This is why the Osage Indians refer to May as the time of the flower-killing moon.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“Your money draws them and you’re absolutely helpless. They have all the law and all the machinery on their side. Tell everybody, when you write your story, that they’re scalping our souls out here”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“The blackest chapter in the history of this State will be the Indian guardianship over these estates,” an Osage leader said, adding, “There has been millions—not thousands—but millions of dollars of many of the Osages dissipated and spent by the guardians themselves.” This so-called Indian business, as White discovered, was an elaborate criminal operation, in which various sectors of society were complicit. The crooked guardians and administrators of Osage estates were typically among the most prominent white citizens: businessmen and ranchers and lawyers and politicians. So were the lawmen and prosecutors and judges who facilitated and concealed the swindling (and, sometimes, acted as guardians and administrators themselves). In 1924, the Indian Rights Association, which defended the interests of indigenous communities, conducted an investigation into what it described as “an orgy of graft and exploitation.” The group documented how rich Indians in Oklahoma were being “shamelessly and openly robbed in a scientific and ruthless manner” and how guardianships were “the plums to be distributed to the faithful friends of the judges as a reward for their support at the polls.” Judges were known to say to citizens, “You vote for me, and I will see that you get a good guardianship.” A white woman married to an Osage man described to a reporter how the locals would plot: “A group of traders and lawyers sprung up who selected certain Indians as their prey. They owned all the officials…. These men had an understanding with each other. They cold-bloodedly said, ‘You take So-and-So, So-and-So and So-and-So and I’ll take these.’ They selected Indians who had full headrights and large farms.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“Only in the mid-nineteenth century, after the growth of industrial cities and a rash of urban riots—after dread of the so-called dangerous classes surpassed dread of the state—did police departments emerge in the United States.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“In April, millions of tiny flowers spread over the blackjack hills and vast prairies in the Osage territory of Oklahoma. There are Johnny-jump-ups and spring beauties and little bluets. The Osage writer John Joseph Mathews observed that the galaxy of petals makes it look as if the “gods had left confetti.” In May, when coyotes howl beneath an unnervingly large moon, taller plants, such as spiderworts and black-eyed Susans, begin to creep over the tinier blooms, stealing their light and water. The necks of the smaller flowers break and their petals flutter away, and before long they are buried underground. This is why the Osage Indians refer to May as the time of the flower-killing moon.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

Also Read: Best Jungle Cruise Quotes 2021

“Many Osage, unlike other wealthy Americans, could not spend their money as they pleased because of the federally imposed system of financial guardians.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“Some day this oil will go and there will be no more fat checks every few months from the Great White Father,” a chief of the Osage said in 1928. “There’ll be no fine motorcars and new clothes. Then I know my people will be happier.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“The Osage had been assured by the U.S. government that their Kansas territory would remain their home forever, but before long they were under siege from settlers. Among them was the family of Laura Ingalls Wilder, who later wrote Little House on the Prairie based on her experiences. “Why don’t you like Indians, Ma?” Laura asks her mother in one scene. “I just don’t like them; and don’t lick your fingers, Laura.” “This is Indian country, isn’t it?” Laura said. “What did we come to their country for, if you don’t like them?” One evening, Laura’s father explains to her that the government will soon make the Osage move away: “That’s why we’re here, Laura. White people are going to settle all this country, and we get the best land because we get here first and take our pick.” Though, in the book, the Ingallses leave the reservation under threat of being removed by soldiers, many squatters began to take the land by force. In 1870, the Osage—expelled from their lodges, their graves plundered—agreed to sell their Kansas lands to settlers for $1.25 an acre. Nevertheless, impatient settlers massacred several of the Osage, mutilating their bodies and scalping them. An Indian Affairs agent said, “The question will suggest itself, which of these people are the savages?”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“The Osage elders sang the traditional songs for the dead, only now the songs seemed for the living, for those who had to endure this world of killing.”
― David grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“The historian Burns once wrote, “To believe that the Osages survived intact from their ordeal is a delusion of the mind. What has been possible to salvage has been saved and is dearer to our hearts because it survived. What is gone is treasured because it was what we once were. We gather our past and present into the depths of our being and face tomorrow. We are still Osage. We live and we reach old age for our forefathers.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

Killers of The Flower Moon Summary

I HAD NO IDEA that this happened. Yet another portion of American history that is suppressed until now. 🙏🏽 God bless the Osage Nation: Your story is FINALLY being told to everyone.

“For years after the American Revolution, the public opposed the creation of police departments, fearing that they would become forces of repression. Instead, citizens responded to a hue and cry by chasing after suspects.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“In 1850 Allan Pinkerton founded the first American private detective agency; in advertisements, the company motto, “We Never Sleep” was inscribed under a large, unblinking Masonic-like eye, which gave rise to the term “private eye”…. William J. Burns was an avid user of a Dictograph- a primitive listening device that could be concealed in anything from a clock to a chandelier…. Just as Allan Pinkerton, in the nineteenth century was known as the eye, Burns, In the twentieth century had become “the ear”.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“Shakespeare wrote in Julius Caesar: Where wilt thou find a cavern dark enough To mask thy monstrous visage? Seek none, conspiracy: Hide it in smiles and affability.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“As she spoke, I realized that the Reign of Terror had ravaged – still ravaged – generations. A great-grandson of Henry Roan’s once spoke of the legacy of the murders: “I think somewhere it is in the back of our minds. We may not realize it, but it is there, especially if it was a family member that was killed. You just have it in the back of your head that you don’t trust anybody.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“A growing number of white Americans expressed alarm over the Osage’s wealth—outrage that was stoked by the press.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“To believe that the Osages survived intact from their ordeal is a delusion of the mind. What has been possible to salvage has been saved and is dearer to our hearts because it survived. What is gone is treasured because it was what we once were. We gather our past and present into the depths of our being and face tomorrow.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“But in 1921, just as the government had once adopted a ration system to pay the Osage for seized land – just as it always seemed to turn its gospel of enlightenment into a hammer of coercion – Congress implemented even more draconian legislation controlling how the Osage could spend their money.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“These Indians became accustomed to lives of glorious ease. But now…their income from oil is rapidly disappearing, and that was practically all they had.” Compounding”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“At forty-four, Mollie could finally spend her money as she pleased, and was recognized as a full-fledged American citizen.”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

“In 1870, the Osage—expelled from their lodges, their graves plundered—agreed to sell their Kansas lands to settlers for $1.25 an acre. Nevertheless, impatient settlers massacred several of the Osage, mutilating their bodies and scalping them. An Indian Affairs agent said, “The question will suggest itself, which of these people are the savages?”
― David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

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